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The history of Middle-Earth (chibi version): Part 65: Brought to bay

16th September 2013 (15:01)

Today's cartoon contains an easter egg for Harry Potter fans who speak ancient Aramaic! :)


There isn't much flashy and obvious magic described in Tolkien's works, but there are two interesting exceptions. In the Silmarillion, Lúthien stands outside Sauron's fortress of Tol-in-Gaurhoth and causes it to collapse into dust with the mere sound of her voice. And in the Appendices to the Lord of the Rings, Galadriel apparently does something very similar to Dol Guldur:

"Celeborn came forth and led the host of Lórien over Anduin in many boats. They took Dol Guldur, and Galadriel threw down its walls and laid bare its pits, and the forest was cleansed."

I'm assuming she used magic, rather than physically going around with a sledgehammer knocking down the walls. :) And I don't think it's coincidental that her first cousin once removed did the same thing to another of Sauron's fortresses a few thousand years earlier. For the purpose of this series, I've assumed it's a special power given to Magical Princesses and Faery Queens in Middle-earth; so Varda Elentári naturally qualifies.

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Part 64: Did the Earth move?


Next time: Part 66: A fair fight

Chibis by tektek.org
Original story by and copyright to J R R Tolkien, ed. C Tolkien: Primarily based on the Silmarillion, but incorporating ideas from the 12-volume History of Middle Earth series.
Questions and comments welcome!

Comments

Posted by: erimthar (erimthar)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 15:52 (UTC)

Is that Aramaic for Confringo?

It's a good thing there are so many holes in Middle Earth for dark lords to cower in! Otherwise the story would be a lot shorter.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 21:48 (UTC)

It's 'avada kedavra', which according to JKR is Aramaic for "be destroyed at this word".

Posted by: curiouswombat (curiouswombat)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 17:16 (UTC)
Galadriel

For the purpose of this series, I've assumed it's a special power given to Magical Princesses and Faery Queens in Middle-earth; so Varda Elentári naturally qualifies.

It's a girl thing.... seems fair enough to me!!

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 21:50 (UTC)

Apparently...

(I kind of get the impression it's related to the old folklore idea that 'the Queen embodies the sovereignity of the land', which includes the power to dissolve any buildings constructed on that land, oat least once the dark force sustaining it has been vanquished.)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 18:02 (UTC)

Eh, dark holes get a bad rap. Really, what else are you supposed to do with them? If you have a sunny glen you can frolic, if you have a blooming field you can cavort, but if all you have is a dark hole? You're pretty much stuck with cowering.

This, of course, is yet another example of Tolkien showing how class, background and even language determine how we use our free will, and how ... oh, sorry, wrong fandom. :)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 16th September 2013 21:51 (UTC)

You can also lurk in a dark hole!

Posted by: Igenlode Wordsmith (igenlode)
Posted at: 19th September 2013 00:41 (UTC)

I'm sure both hobbits and Dwarfs would bridle at the assumption that a nice underground area must inherently be a dark hole fit only for cowering in :-)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 19th September 2013 13:02 (UTC)

Ah, but I'm sure Hobbit-holes and Dwarf mines are brightly lit, not dark!

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