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(Review) BtVS 8.09 'No Future For You' Part 4

6th December 2007 (19:25)

As I walked out of the shop with this month's copy of the Season 8 comic today, I had to physically restrain myself from tearing open the bag and flicking to the last page to see what would happen. Would Faith die? What would happen to Gigi? What was Buffy going to do to Giles? Would Faith really turn out to be Gigi's long-lost sister? ('No' is the answer to that last question, unfortunately).

But I was strong, and waited, and read it through in the right order, front to back. And what did I think?

Mixed feelings, really. Up until the big climax, I was gripped. But the coda with Faith and Giles seemed a real let-down: flat, incredibly cheesy, and the sort of thing I associate more with formulaic US TV shows that aren't produced by Joss Whedon or his imitators. Even the big reveal scene at the end lost some of its impact because of that. However, on a second read-through pre-prepared for the ending, it didn't seem quite so bad. And there's certainly a lot of exposition and characterisation in this episode for meta-writers to get their teeth into; so overall I'd rate it Good (narrowly missing out on a higher rating due to those two pages).

Anyway, now for the detail.

We start with another extended flashback. Personally it seemed to go on a bit too long for me after it had made its point, but I know lots of people like Mayor Wilkins... and after I've spent so much time defending the previous scenes with Giant Dawn because they're just fun to read, I can't really criticise this one. Well, except that Faith in a dress looks like she's eight. There could, of course, be dark psychological reasons why the Mayor would want to infantilise Faith... sorry, Fay, but I'm one of those people you talk about who really do think that 'he was, like, exploiting you or whatever'. It is interesting to see Faith's own take on that period in her life. She's not actually disagreeing with the idea that he was an evil scumbag who was exploiting her... she's just saying that it didn't feel like that at the time, and she still has fond memories of him despite knowing the truth about him now. And this gives her empathy for Gigi - something she consciously acknowledges. There are, of course, a lot of parallels being drawn in this arc, and it's nice to see that the characters themselves are capable of spotting at least some of them.

Also, Wilkins' dialogue is spot on.

Faith ended last month drained and mentally shattered after her fight with Buffy - so it's probably a good thing Gigi stops to talk first instead of swinging the axe... and when she does, it's to hit Faith with its butt instead of the blade. She's feeling betrayed and angry and upset, but she still cares about Faith... at least, she does until she realises she's American. :-)

There may be some symbolism in the fact that Gigi's axe is literally a two-edged sword axe, given what happens later. Not to mention that the labrys is occasionally used today as a symbol of feminism, matriarchy, and as a recognition device for lesbians to identify each other.
:-) 

I did smile at the way Faith gets back her mojo because Gigi assumes she's from New York instead of Boston - though I don't know if that's just a generic thing or there is actually a historical rivalry between the two cities? And kudos to Faith for knowing at least enough of her local history to have heard about the Tea Party, even if she did miss out on ten years or so of schooling.

Even more kudos to her for beating Gigi so comfortably. Like I said last time, Faith had a history on both Buffy and Angel of losing most of the important fights she was in... but last month she defeated Buffy, and this time she defeats Gigi just as easily. Jumping over the swinging axe parallels her fight with the gargoyles earlier - but landing on its handle, balancing there on one foot and kicking Gigi over is just a ridiculously cool stunt. Throughout the fighting, Faith is trying to convince Gigi that Roden is exploiting her, just like Wilkins exploited Faith.

Then, we get another typical scene break with Gigi's line about Faith never having a best mate, leading straight to a picture of Giles. That foreshadows the ending between the two of them - but also, the fact that Gigi herself is reflected in Faith's eye suggests what might have been between the two girls themselves. (Can I also work a mention of Buffy into this paragraph too?)

In the next scene, I'm assuming that Trafalgar just hit the barrier too hard with that hammer of his, and it's shattered. Giles' pun on "speaking of witch/which" is something I think would have worked better spoken, instead of written. Incidentally, the British dialogue is slightly dodgy in this issue as per usual - although the only bit that actually made me cringe is Gigi calling Roden 'her best mate' in the middle of an argument. However, I can only applaud the way Giles' phone comes up with the message 'Willow mobile' rather than 'Willow cell', which is what I suspect Buffy's phone would say...

Anyway, why did Buffy have to borrow Willow's mobile? Has she forgotten her own one again? :-) (Or, on a darker note, does she not have Giles' number programmed into it?)

And now we know how things stand between Buffy and Giles. They're still ostensibly on the same side, as far as we can see (despite some theories that people suggested, that Giles is now working for a rival organisation). But from Giles' point of view, he is, as implied at the start of this arc (and in 'The Gift'), doing the dirty work so that Buffy doesn't need to get her own hands dirty or shoulder that guilt. From Buffy's point of view, he's acting like a loose cannon, almost getting her killed because he no longer trusts her with vital information, and undermining her authority in front of the other assembled Slayers. It's no wonder she's in such a black mood (shown rather effectively by the shadows in the artwork) by the end of that scene.

Interesting contrast between Willow's and Xander's reactions - both want to help her, but they have different ways of showing it. Bearing in mind what we've been told about the next issue (a stand-alone called 'Anywhere But Here' featuring a long conversation between Buffy and Willow, and the winner of a fan competition who's someone Buffy helped get through serious depression), I think we're seeing the set-up for that here.

Back to the action. It's fast and furious, and Faith gets another cool move snatching the secateurs out of the air, and Gigi reassesses her opinion of Roden now that Faith's not her friend anymore. (Or at least, she claims to in order to justify herself to Faith).

And then it all goes tragically wrong. I have to say, I didn't see this coming... I thought Faith might kill Gigi, or Roden would do it himself, or Buffy would, or she might even survive as a reformed character. I didn't anticipate Faith killing her by accident - although having seen it, I can't imagine the story ending any other way. Killing somebody by accident is how Faith's slide into darkness began, and it's fitting that her climb back to the light should also end the same way. And Faith's line as she kicks Gigi back - "If you're so sick of the bad dreams then wake the fuck up" - has a certain irony and appropriateness about it.

Which song is Gigi referring to in her last words? There's no obvious clue, so I'm going to go by the title of the arc. Which certainly fits...

God save the Queen,
She ain't no human being,
And there's no future
In England's dreaming.
Don't be told what you want.
Don't be told what you need.
There's no future,
No future,
No future for you.

And does Roden care? Not a bit. With Gigi dead, he immediately tries to recruit Faith instead. (Along with giving us some interesting exposition which I'll get back to at the end). There's a moment where it looks like Faith might be tempted by the idea of turning on Buffy, but it's pretty obvious that she's not ever going to do that for real. Jeanty's drawing of Faith's changing expression as she hits Roden is really well done, I thought... and a nice shout-out to the fact that Faith is not the sort of person to curl up with a good book.

In fact, I've sometimes wondered if she can read and write at all, given how little formal education she apparently received ("Oh, it's a school thing. I was kinda absent that decade."). I believe we see her looking through a comic book in season 3, but that doesn't necessarily require literacy. :-) In season 7 we see her pulling a written report on Caleb towards herself as if to study it, though - so perhaps she took adult literacy classes in prison as part of her rehab. Any thoughts? Have I missed some really obvious example of Faith reading or writing things?

Interesting that Roden gets the solid black eyes and veins that Dark Willow got, but his hair stays red even when he uses his evil magic. Maybe he dyes his hair? :-) (Which would imply that in canon, Willow is a natural redhead who dyed her hair a mousy darker colour in the early seasons so she wouldn't be as conspicuous. ;-) )

Anybody who dares to accuse Faith of 'starting to sag a bit' deserves to die in a horrible and painful manner. Luckily, today wishes are horses and beggars eat steak.

Looks like Willow managed to teleport Giles through Roden's barrier easily enough, though I wonder if any stray marmosets got caught up in the spell too. The knife in the back is enough to disrupt his spell, but not kill him - which is what we'd expect from a powerful warlock after seeing 'Villains'. ("Axe? Not gonna cut it.") Also, Roden proves himself even more misogynistic, thus deserving his fast-approaching fate even more. Nice bit of teamwork between Faith and Giles - especially her trust in his ability to use the spellbook effectively. Mind you, I'm not exactly sure what he does here - open the book at random, choose a spell, think of a way to make it effective and cast it, all while Roden is lunging at him with a pair of pruning shears? Lucky that Roden is overconfident enough to stand there and watch and mock him, rather than trying to stop him...

Today's lesson: don't mess with Rupert Giles. Nice artwork on his face.

And if the comic had ended there, I'd have been really happy. :-)

Not that the next scene is awful, just a bit obvious. Giles had the passport and tickets, just as promised; no twist to the story there (I was still hoping that with Gigi dead, Faith would turn out to be the Savidge heiress... but no). And Faith turns down the 'retirement' after all, because she's not really ready to quit... just like I'd been predicting ever since the first episode in this arc.

Though the thought of her hanging up her stake and becoming a mentor to problem Slayers is an interesting twist, and the more I think about it, I can see it as a good idea. Roden's comment about what happens to Slayers who are past their prime is a valid one, however crudely expressed; and while Faith is only still in her early to mid 20s, there will presumably come a day when she shouldn't be out in the field every night. (Assuming, of course, that new Slayers are still being Called when they pass puberty, rather than the current batch being the only ones in existence - which is a big question the comics haven't yet addressed at all). Of course the obvious Slayer for Faith to try to help next would be Dana (an idea frogfarm has played about with quite a bit), so I wonder if she'll show up in a future episode?

Giles and Faith teaming up to bring comfort and support to downtrodden Slayers in defiance of Buffy is the really cheesy part, although I can see potential for some interesting stories exploring the ramifications. (Also, can you say 'spin-off?' Though does this mean that Giles will now be [even more] separate to the main storyline?) Happily, the Steed/Peel line and Faith's reaction to it is funny enough to almost salvage the scene. Not to mention explain the variant cover.

I'm not sure if we're supposed to be reading sexual attraction into Giles' and Faith's behaviour or not, though there's certainly enough there to feed fanfics - Faith's "guys I dig" comment being the main element. I never watched the Avengers, but I gather Steed and Peel had a working relationship with its share of flirting and sexual tension, but were never an actual couple. Given the parallels drawn between Faith-Wilkins and Faith-Giles, (some of those parallels drawn by Faith herself in this story), I suspect that might be more the template intended. But I'm sure we'll find out sooner or later. (And imagine Buffy's face if she discovers Faith and Giles are sleeping together... it might be worth doing it that way just for that scene...)

And now the big reveal. We're almost a quarter of the way through season 8 now: call it episode 5 in TV terms. (That works if you assume each 4-issue arc is a double episode, and 'The Chain' was a short stand-alone episode.) In season 5, episode 5 was the one that first revealed Glory; and in season 8, we come face to face with Twilight for the first time. Who apparently is an individual, rather than the name of an organisation. (Or both). Incidentally, the woman talking to him is a bit of a mystery. She's addressed as Lieutenant Molter, but Lieutenant seems rather a lowly rank to be the main liaison to the leader of Twilight - and she's clearly not at all in awe of him, judging by her comments. Plus she has an impressive display of medals on her chest for her to be so junior... unless this is evidence of the US armed forces giving out medals for learning to drive and showing up on parade more than once a week. :-) Incidentally, does anyone recognise her uniform? (I assume Jeanty would use a photo of a real woman officer as a guide for his sketch). It being blue kind of makes me think she's in the Air Force, although her shoulder badge has crossed sabres, which implies a cavalry unit.

And she's riding in an unmarked black helicopter, which should please all the conspiracy freaks out there. :-)  (ETA: the helicopter in question appears to be an MH-60 Black Hawk, a US Army design used for special operations (see the film 'Black Hawk Down' for an example).)

We get more exposition on Twilight's plan, added to what Roden said earlier in the issue. I did comment in a previous review on the oddness of the organisation having both magic-users and technology, and now we see the explanation - Roden and Gigi were expendable puppets, and Twilight was manoeuvring for their mutual destruction along with Buffy. He also sees the break between Giles and Buffy as a victory for his side... and it's now confirmed that there's a traitor in Buffy's team. A male traitor ("our man on the inside"), which does kinda limit the options... Oh Xander, how could you?! (But see also below. :-) )

Roden speaks of being promised "clemency from the coming purge" (one suspects he was lied to, in the light of Twilight's words), and Twilight here states his aim openly: "bringing the age of magic to a close". Which is interesting, in the light of what we know from Fray:

"It was some hundreds of years ago, in the twenty-first century. What we know is this - there was a battle. A Slayer, possibly with some mystical allies, faced an apocalyptic army of demons. And when it was done... they were gone. All demons, all magicks, banished from this Earthly dimension."
"And the Slayer? Did she--?"
"I do not know if she lived. But the demons being gone, she was the last to be Called."
- Joss Whedon, 'Fray'

I'm thinking it's not a coincidence that Twilight's evil plan seems to have the same aim.

And now the big question. Who is Twilight? There's already been some speculation on this when the Issue 11 cover was previewed, since he appears on that too. The simplest option is that he's just some guy in a fancy suit, whom we've never met before. Given his apparent hatred of magic it's a little incongruous for him to be flying when we first see him, but maybe he's actually using a technological anti-gravity device or something instead. (And also, it seems that he was the one watching Buffy's commando raid in Episode 1). However, there have been some hints dropped that the Big Bad will be someone familiar; a returning character. So in that light, what are the possibilities?

1) Adam would be the most obvious. He's already a cyborg; if he somehow managed to get re-activated with a new power source, there's no reason why he couldn't upgrade himself further. He's got the military connections and knowledge... and after Buffy defeated him using magic, he's got a good motivation to really, really hate magic and want to banish it from the world. Also, Twilight's plan to stir up his enemies to fight each other is reminiscent of Adam's plan in 'The Yoko Factor' on a larger scale.

2) Personally, I like the idea of it being Caleb. Yes, the last we saw of Caleb he'd just been unseamed from the chaps to the nave by Buffy's Scythe... but here, Twilight is tightly wrapped with straps bound around his waist, a breastplate and an all-over face-covering that would neatly hide the join if he were, in fact, the two halves of Caleb crudely stuck back together and re-animated by the power of the First. Warren's reappearance in the first arc could therefore act as foreshadowing for the eventual reveal of who's behind Twilight's mask. Caleb is an experienced leader and has lots of contacts, though not specifically in the military field (though I bet The First could arrange that); and after his master's big plan was foiled by magic and the massed Slayers, getting rid of both would seem attractive to him.

3) It's Andrew. That nerdy, bumbling façade is just an act, and he really is the evil mastermind he claimed to be. Really. And he's the traitor himself, playing a double game.

So. Where do we go from here?

Comments

Posted by: idiotnighthawk (idiotnighthawk)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 21:26 (UTC)

After this issue, I jumped "No Future For You" into my top 10 Buffy episodes. Your review is excellent. I particularly loved how Faith sincerely wanted to help Genevieve, and I cried like Faith did at her loss. It was so poignant to see Faith order Roden, her enemy, to heal Genevieve.

I didn't have the problems with Faith and Giles deciding to do their own thing -- frankly, if he's going to disregard Buffy so completely going forward, he might as well find some other way to help out.

As for the spy thing -- you never came back to the Xander thing. I think it would be ridiculous to abuse Xander (or Willow, or Dawn) as a traitor, since they are such important access points for fans. Especially with an announced Season 9 -- would we really want to go on without all the core Scoobies.

I do think that Lt. Molter is there for something insightful. She's the spy's apparent handler, knows at least enough *of* Buffy to think of her on a first-name basis -- my money is on Renee as the mole. Whether she would be a willing or unwilling spy, I wouldn't dare to guess, but my hunch is that Lt. Molter is some sort of relation to her who entered into the same kind of Faustian deal that Roden did to have Renee spared from the "purge". It would track well with why she seems to spend more time around the Scoobies than the other Slayers, and a whole new layer of motivation to be angling for Xander.

Twilight... I hope is a new character. If he's a returning character in disguise, I think the boldest choice they could make would be Riley. I could see him, through various circumstances, building up a seething resentment toward magic, toward Slayers, toward all of it, and want to take it down.

I'm going to think not with Caleb, because the Twilight stuff? Not really in keeping with the "fairly straightforward" ways he admired so much in "Dirty Girls". Plus... he split.

Incidentally, for those without access to the comics, I've posted the 8.09 transcript on http://www.buffyforums.net/forums/showthread.php?t=164

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 23:26 (UTC)

Well, my mention of Xander was intended as a joke... I don't seriously think he'd be the spy. Although having said that, it would certainly be a shocking, intense and gripping plot twist, so maybe that's exactly what Joss is planning after all...

If it is him, I'd have to think it was either under duress/blackmail (as you suggest for Renee) or some form of unnatural compulsion. They've done that plot before, though (Riley in S4, Spike in S7) so maybe not.

But apart from him, Andrew and Giles, what other men are there in Buffy's organisation?

Thanks for the comment!

Posted by: skipp_of_ark (skipp_of_ark)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 10:54 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 18:20 (UTC)

Posted by: skipp_of_ark (skipp_of_ark)
Posted at: 9th December 2007 06:54 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 22:33 (UTC)

Great review as always!

We start with another extended flashback.

I liked the flashback, except that it seemed completely redundant. Why would the Mayor (an experienced speaker, no less) go on to tell Faith that he sees her as a daughter only seconds after he (on the TV show) told her he sees himself as her father? Surely he doesn't think she's that slow?

Anyway, why did Buffy have to borrow Willow's mobile? Has she forgotten her own one again? :-) (Or, on a darker note, does she not have Giles' number programmed into it?)

Or does she have reason to believe Giles wouldn't answer her call?

They're still ostensibly on the same side, as far as we can see (despite some theories that people suggested, that Giles is now working for a rival organisation).

Still not convinced. Even if he *isn't* Evil!Robot!Giles (which I'll admit looks a bit less likely considering his riding off into the sunset (heh) with Faith) he does seem to a) have his own agenda, and b) deliberately distance himself from Buffy. There's a limit to how little two people can communicate, how much they can run around behind each others' backs, and still claim to work for the same organization. Like I mentioned in shapinglight's post; though I see your point about Giles protecting Buffy, he should also be smart enough to know that everything he does right from the beginning here only distances him further from Buffy, and we still don't know why he would do that or why he had to use Faith for it. Oh well, I guess that'll be explained in #42.

Mind you, I'm not exactly sure what he does here - open the book at random, choose a spell, think of a way to make it effective and cast it, all while Roden is lunging at him with a pair of pruning shears?

Yeah, I didn't get that either. Interesting though: this spell invokes Nisanti, whatever that is - just like Willow did in 8.08, and Faith in 8.06. But maybe that's just spell-castin' talk for "Amen" or something.

Giles and Faith teaming up to bring comfort and support to downtrodden Slayers in defiance of Buffy is the really cheesy part

Agreed. Though it WOULD seem that Giles has his own Slayers, as seen in 8.02 and 8.05 - up until recently I assumed that Buffy knew about that. Now... I'm not so sure.

Though does this mean that Giles will now be [even more] separate to the main storyline?

Unless he's the man on the inside...

Who is Twilight?

I don't see it being Caleb. Nothing we've seen of Twilight's plans or methods so far seems even remotely like something Caleb or the First would do. I still say cyberninjas. Or possibly Billy Fordham (who's been fitted with a robotic brain instead of the cancer-stricken one.)

Good episode, at least certainly better than LWH, but while the ending isn't as lame as I had feared - having Faith end up in a mental institution or prison, or as a rich British noblewoman ;-) - it just feels... like there's no closure to it.

That works if you assume each 4-issue arc is a double episode

Except the show usually managed to cram a lot more stuff into a 42-minute episode than they've managed in either 4-issue arc so far, IMO. But what the hell. I'll have to re-read the entire arc and think about it, especially the question of what the point of Faith's whole arc was if she won't be back for a while...

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 23:47 (UTC)
faith

Why would the Mayor (an experienced speaker, no less) go on to tell Faith that he sees her as a daughter only seconds after he (on the TV show) told her he sees himself as her father?

I'd not remembered he said that in that scene, but it really does make it seem even more redundant. I'm guessing the 'point' of the flashback is simply to give us a nice savoury slice of Wilkins dialogue (enjoyable enough as it is) and to keep us in suspense a little bit longer about how the Faith-Gigi confrontation will end. Plus remind anyone who's forgotten about the Mayor's relationship with Faith...


it WOULD seem that Giles has his own Slayers

I'm *fairly* sure Buffy knows about that. Maybe a little less sure than I was, but fairly sure... Although his comments in 8.02 about "giving Buffy Summers herself a run for her money" suddenly seem a lot more sinister...


it just feels... like there's no closure to it.
Like I said, it felt to me as if Dark Horse will be announcing a 'Faith' spinoff comic series in a month or so. Though the way they handled the deaths of Gigi and Roden and the reaction of our characters did feel like closure to me.

the show usually managed to cram a lot more stuff into a 42-minute episode than they've managed in either 4-issue arc so far, IMO

Remember when I wrote out the scrpts of the first four issues? Each one came to about 3,000 words or a little under. The shooting scripts of the Season Seven TV episodes are about 9-10,000 words each - so one TV episode is actually about three issues of the comic in terms of the amount of dialogue. On the other hand, Mutant Enemy's scripts seem to have a bit more description and stage directions than mine did, so maybe two issues per episode isn't actually that far out.

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 00:03 (UTC)

Posted by: idiotnighthawk (idiotnighthawk)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 17:02 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 17:14 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 10:11 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 17:16 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:22 (UTC)

Posted by: idiotnighthawk (idiotnighthawk)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 16:20 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 16:31 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 17:11 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:04 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 18:30 (UTC)

Posted by: Shapinglight (shapinglight)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 18:30 (UTC)

Posted by: Beer Good (beer_good_foamy)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:14 (UTC)

Posted by: Shapinglight (shapinglight)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 17:52 (UTC)

Posted by: skipp_of_ark (skipp_of_ark)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:27 (UTC)

Posted by: shakatany (shakatany)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 23:00 (UTC)

Thanks for the info. I hope to peruse the issue later if/when my local Borders gets it.

or there is actually a historical rivalry between the two cities? Well there is if one's a baseball fan - the rivalry between the Red Sox fans and the Yankee fans is legendary.

Shakatany

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 6th December 2007 23:30 (UTC)

The baseball rivalry sounds good enough for me. Thanks!
:-)

Posted by: catalyst2 (catalyst2)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 03:16 (UTC)

Great review - and so much to think about already before I've even read the issue!

The song, btw, is "God save the Queen" by the Sex Pistols.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 16:59 (UTC)

Thanks!

In fact, Gigi doesn't say which song she's referring to - it's just my guess that she means 'God Save The Queen' because that's the title of the overall arc. I looked up the words on a lyrics site (then corrected them from memory since they weren't quite right. :-) ) for this review.

Posted by: catalyst2 (catalyst2)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 08:23 (UTC)

Posted by: Shapinglight (shapinglight)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 18:25 (UTC)

The Faith/Giles conversation at the end was actually my favourite bit of the whole comic. I didn't think it was cheesy. Good dialogue saved it.

Can pretty much give you a cast-iron guarantee there won't be any Faith/Giles, though. I think Giles was very much being compared to the Mayor here, as a father-figure (though presumably a better one - though I'm not sure, considering he wanted Faith to commit murder).

As for a possible return of Caleb - God, no! Hated that character. I think your theory about a connection between Twilight and the robot ninjas in Lineage is a lot more likely.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 18:31 (UTC)

Certainly Twilight's dialogue didn't sound much like the sort of thing Caleb would say. Also, he was talking to a woman in that scene without being outspokenly misogynistic. :-)

By the way, I've just posted some more on Faith's childlike appearance and Buffy and Giles' quarrel, if you've not seen it yet?

Posted by: Shapinglight (shapinglight)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 19:16 (UTC)

Posted by: aycheb (aycheb)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 20:46 (UTC)

But the coda with Faith and Giles seemed a real let-down
I was just so relieved it didn't involve a sobbing Gigi taking her first steps on the road to redemption I gave it a near complete pass. Then a complete one when Twilight made it clear that rather than going against a too righteous Buffy they were doing his/her job for him/her.

Anyway, why did Buffy have to borrow Willow's mobile?
If she were in the habit of carrying her own phone on her person it would have been pretty much wrecked by the drowning if nothing else. Quicker to ask for the nearest person's, which was Willow. If she doesn't carry it she could accio it.

."If you're so sick of the bad dreams then wake the fuck up" - has a certain irony and appropriateness about it.
Am very happy with the way dreams continue to be referenced.

Which song is Gigi referring to in her last words?
My biggest problem with Vaughan's writing is the over reliance on song lyrics. It and the constant pop culture references work in his own comic as he mostly restricts them to self-admitted geek characters of which there are many but on Buffy he has everyone use them more indiscriminately.

Twilight here states his aim openly: "bringing the age of magic to a close".
Which fits with the increased prevalence of fairy tale characters that some have been complaining about - if the age of magic is to end it helps to show that it's still going. Also it acts a metaphor for the gang's broadened horizons post-Sunnydale.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 21:01 (UTC)

Very good point about the state Buffy's mobile would be in if she actually carried it... though I think it's much more in character for her to have left it behind, or let its charge run out.

On the other hand... they're standing in a high-tech communications centre full of satellite uplinks and all kinds of stuff like that, arent they? :-)


I didn't mind Gigi quoting song lyrics, because she and Faith just spent the last couple of days discussing each others' taste in music. It was just that there was no clue that she was referring specifically to the Sex Pistols.

In fact, my immediate reaction was that Faith saying "I never meant..." was a cue for Gigi to be thinking "...to hurt you; I'm sorry that I made you cry. I never meant to hurt you; I'm just a jealous guy." But that didn't really fit the scene...

Posted by: aycheb (aycheb)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 21:25 (UTC)

Posted by: Elena (moscow_watcher)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:18 (UTC)

I thouroughly enjoyed your review.

Re Twilight.

I may be wrong (BtVS season 8 is the first comic I read) but when I was reading the Twilight's lines I've got the impression that Hindu-stylized font implies Hindu accent. And the mole on Lt. Molter's cheek reminded me of the girls in Hindu movies.

Not sure if it could be important for Twilight's identification, but... ::shrugs::

Posted by: skipp_of_ark (skipp_of_ark)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:35 (UTC)

In comics, stylized fonts like Twilight's are usually a visual way to get across the idea that the character's voice is somehow very different from what we would consider a "normal," human voice. It's usually used for characters who are aliens, demons or monsters, or otherwise decidedly non-human...and sometimes for humans who are trying to distort or disguise their voices. If this was a comic book adaptation of the movie "The Wizard of Oz," for example, the Wizard's voice before the discovery of "the man behind the curtain" would possibly use such a font.

Posted by: Elena (moscow_watcher)
Posted at: 7th December 2007 22:51 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 8th December 2007 18:55 (UTC)

Posted by: kiwikatipo (kiwikatipo)
Posted at: 10th December 2007 03:46 (UTC)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 10th December 2007 22:55 (UTC)

Posted by: lilred26x (lilred26x)
Posted at: 13th December 2007 02:35 (UTC)

I really enjoy your reviews. I'm hoping the man on the inside comment is not actually referring to a "man" because, as you mentioned, there really are not many of them. I don't think I would like any of them being a bad guy. It's like Cordelia being a "bad guy". It just never worked for me. I could see this just being an expression and the "man" turn out to be a slayer. As far as Boston versus New York, I don't know of any historical rivalry other than baseball as another person mentioned, but being from Maine myself, I do know that I am often asked if I am from Boston or New York because of my accent, and it just seems a little insulting because I like being from Maine. That's how I took Faith's reaction. She was proud of being from Boston and doesn't like being accused of being from somewhere else. :)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 13th December 2007 12:32 (UTC)

I can see Faith just being annoyed at Gigi's mistake on general grounds, but it seemed as if BKV was trying for a deliberate reference to something. But maybe not.

I do remember visiting the US one time, and the hotel porter carrying my bag assumed from my (British) accent, and possibly because I'm tall and fair-skinned, that I was German. I was a bit annoyed by that...


Thanks!

Posted by: ベル物 (bell) (usomitai)
Posted at: 30th December 2007 10:39 (UTC)

On the Boston vs. NY rivalry, I've always felt that there's a bit of Boston pride/competition against NY to be better/more historical/cooler/ etc.

As for Faith knowing about the Tea Party-- you can't live in Boston and not know about it. It is impossible, I assure you. :D

Posted by: ((Anonymous))
Posted at: 30th January 2011 01:56 (UTC)
Seotons

Seotons

[url=http://www.seotons-test.com]seotons[/url]

Posted by: chianazhaan (chianazhaan)
Posted at: 2nd July 2011 20:34 (UTC)
Where have I seen that before.

I didn't anticipate Faith killing her by accident - although having seen it, I can't imagine the story ending any other way. Killing somebody by accident is how Faith's slide into darkness began, and it's fitting that her climb back to the light should also end the same way.

Too bad the producers had to keep changing the angle at which the blade is stuck on the tree. And how much it's stuck in the tree.

I'm also unsure what a containment spell inside the body is supposed to do. And "burst"?

Ultimately, the whole arc feels like it's rehashing 7 years of the television series. Giles is estranged from Buffy; still or again? Giles is going behind Buffy's back; again. Faith and Buffy at eachother's throat again. How many times does that make it? Twilight has a spy in Buffy's ranks. Hello Ben/Glory! (BTW, maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but they *never* revealed the spy did they.) And giant Dawn brings back memories of stealing Dawn.

And knowing who Twilight is, and how you can "end the age of magic"...well, it all feels pointless, doesn't it? Why doesn't Twilight break the egg himself? Could have saved everyone a lot of trouble.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 3rd July 2011 01:15 (UTC)
Re: Where have I seen that before.

Well spotted on the incredible moving axe - I missed that. The thing about the containment spell is also confusing, though I guess the idea that instead of the spell creating a field to hold Roden inside it, Giles reversed it so it's inside him and pushes him away from it - in all directions at once.


maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but they *never* revealed the spy did they

You're right, they didn't - at least not as a big "Oh my god, X is a traitor!" reveal. Although we did discover that Angel was spying on Buffy in person (remember his boots in 8.01?), and that Amy could use her magic cauldron to watch what was going on in Slayer HQ, and that Riley was a double agent. So between them, they had plenty of sources of information on what Buffy was up to.


Why doesn't Twilight break the egg himself?

Twilight the Sentient Universe didn't want the egg destroyed - she needed it for herself. At this stage, she's still trying to manoeuvre her future parents into conceiving her. I think the idea that Twilight the organisation is working to end all magic and demons is a lie, pure and simple.

Edited at 2011-07-03 01:15 (UTC)

Posted by: chianazhaan (chianazhaan)
Posted at: 3rd July 2011 01:28 (UTC)
Re: Where have I seen that before.

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