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(Review) BtVS 8.39 'Last Gleaming' Part 4

4th December 2010 (01:10)

I had to struggle through snow that came halfway up to my knees to get this issue of Season 8. I hope you all appreciate my sacrifice. :-)

Review of 8.39 'Last Gleaming' Part 4Collapse )

 


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Posted by: empresspatti (empresspatti)
Posted at: 4th December 2010 20:37 (UTC)

I haven't ever read the comics - but I NEVER miss your meta. Which is wonderful.

Unlike the comics == feh, what a mess.

I think Ewoks would prolly be an improvement. Right now I get the feeling Joss is doing everything he can to make sure no one ever wants to read/see/hear BtVS again...

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 5th December 2010 23:34 (UTC)

Thank you, even if I disagree somewhat on the comics. :-)

Posted by: Elena (moscow_watcher)
Posted at: 4th December 2010 22:31 (UTC)

Interesting review, thank you for sharing.

When Angel tells Buffy "You created a world. You can't turn away from it" did everybody else get the impression that this was talking metaphorically about Joss and the Buffyverse? (Especially given that it's Dark Horse's editor-in-chief who wrote this particular issue; maybe Angel was expressing Scott's thoughts to Joss.

Interesting - but does it imply that we're supposed to look at the situation through the bad guy's eyes?

Now Angel has killed one of the Core Four, someone loved by (almost) everyone - and he killed her in a way which we in the audience will instantly recognise as the same way he killed Jenny, even down to the circular motif in the architecture behind him.

Um, typo - it's "him".

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 5th December 2010 23:40 (UTC)

Well, it's a common trope in Joss's works that it's the bad guys who tell the straight, unvarnished truth.

Also, I think the metaphor is that Joss himself is Buffy (as he's admitted), and Angel represents all the pain of the creative process. Or possibly he's beating Joss up after he dared to create a new universe (Firefly, Dollhouse) and then abandon them half-finished. :D

Unfortunately, by this metaphor, it ends with Buffy\Joss smashing the Seed of his creativity, which presumably means that from now on he'll only make bland, formulaic mass-market Hollywood shows like The Avengers.


Yes.Thanks.

Posted by: TimeTravellingBunny (boot_the_grime)
Posted at: 5th December 2010 02:02 (UTC)
Always Darkest

And the fight shfts to the Seed chamber. When Angel tells Buffy "You created a world. You can't turn away from it" did everybody else get the impression that this was talking metaphorically about Joss and the Buffyverse? (Especially given that it's Dark Horse's editor-in-chief who wrote this particular issue; maybe Angel was expressing Scott's thoughts to Joss. :D ) Though from the violence in the scene and the way Angel is kicking Buffy around, it's clear that Joss's relationship with the world he created is not exactly a smooth one either...

But since Joss is credited as co-writer and since Joss has been very involved with season 8 and is no doubt the one who ultimately has the word on the story lines and developments... I think the best theory is that season 8 is about the universe Joss has created, but it got out of hand. After all, Joss did say recently in an interview that he finally realized that "Buffy was me".

However... I don't think that Twilight is Buffyverse. Because 1) Joss didn't really abandon Buffyverse, and 2) Buffyverse is not soulless, dull, unchanging and dead like the Twilight universe is. Maybe it's more about the things that Joss's creation has spawned. Think about it... Soulless shell of a universe, with lots of overblown, ridiculous 'romantic' elements that feel like a distorted, parodied version of early seasons Bangel... Remind you of anything? ;)

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 6th December 2010 00:00 (UTC)

I agree that in the big picture, the metaphor works better if Buffy's own universe is the Buffyverse, and the Twilight one they create is a stand-in for either other people's spinoffs (Stephenie Meyer et al) or possibly for Joss's other, more recent projects. They're all battling over the Seed of Wonder, the creative spark that can give life to the stories, because there isn't enough of it to go round for all of them.

But in this instance, because Scott Allie wrote this specific issue of this arc, it amused me to think there was another message being played underneath; that Scott (Angel) was beating up Joss (Buffy) for daring to think about moving onto new projects and abandoning the world he created, which is Dark Horse's best-selling line of comics.

(Deleted comment)
Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 6th December 2010 00:08 (UTC)

Thanks! (There's a link to all my S8 reviews in the links list over on the right, if you're interested).

I did like the dynamic in Angel S5 that Spike was finally learning to be his own man, and do the things that he thought were right rather than what was expected of him by the people around him (be that Cecily, Drusilla, Angelus or Buffy). As a souled vampire with a lot to atone for, I can certainly see him being the one to understand Angel and reach out to him, although I'm sure he'd hide it behind a huge layer of snark and fake-dismissiveness.

Posted by: singer_shaper (singer_shaper)
Posted at: 7th December 2010 19:12 (UTC)
slayers

Out of curiosity - and I ask you this because you do like the comics - do you think going global turned the Slayer narrative on its head? Can a Slayer still be a Slayer if she's not the only one?

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 7th December 2010 21:00 (UTC)

"The thing about changing the world; once you do, the world's all different".

I wouldn't say it turned the narrative on its head, because it's still the same basic concept: people having ordinary reactions to extraordinary events, and the supernatural standing in as metaphor for real-life problems. There's still clear continuity in terms of the characters and their personalities from the TV show, but they're in a new situation so of course they have to scramble to adapt to it. That's what make it interesting.

Plus, Buffy might not be the one and only Slayer anymore, but she's still burdened with a unique weight of responsibilities that she can't share with anyone. Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

Posted by: William B (local_max)
Posted at: 13th December 2010 10:15 (UTC)

Rather late to the party on this one, but I enjoyed the review.

The panel of the Wiccans as a reverse of the Chosen montage: excellent!

I definitely thought of the space scene in Twilight when Buffy has her dialogue-less panel, also. In a way they're kind of bookend moments--two times where Buffy made a huge leap of faith, in a sense. She jumps onto Angel and believes him; she decides that smashing the Seed is the best option.

Posted by: StephenT (stormwreath)
Posted at: 13th December 2010 14:12 (UTC)

Thanks! Though the montage of depowered Wiccans was only "excellent" in the sense that means "horribly depressing, but well done artistically". :-)

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